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Friday, 13 January 2012 14:56

The Dead Women of Juárez

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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Since 1993 over four hundred women have been abducted and murdered in Ciudad Juárez and Chihuahua (both are in in the state of Chihuahua, north Mexico). Many of the women are brutally beaten and raped before being killed and their bodies dumped in the desert or on a secluded street. Others simply disappear without trace.
Thursday, 22 December 2011 19:05

7 Ways to Kill a Cat by Matias Néspolo

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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When Argentina suffered financial collapse in 2001, demonstrators took to the streets and there were violent confrontations followed by a police crackdown. This is the turbulent backdrop to Matías Néspolo’s debut novel, first published in Spanish in 2009 and fluidly translated by Frank Wynne. It proves particularly topical given the recent global protests.
Tuesday, 22 November 2011 11:40

Interview with Iosi Havilio

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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Iosi Havilio was born in Buenos Aires in 1974. Open Door is his first novel. His second novel is Estocolmo (Stockholm, 2010), and he is currently working on a sequel to Open Door. He has become a cult author in Argentina after Open Door was highly praised by the outspoken and influential writer Rodolfo Fogwill and by the most influential Argentine critic, Beatriz Sarlo.
Saturday, 12 November 2011 12:30

Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas

Published in Literature Written by Sam
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Why do so many of us remain indifferent when a bloodied face pops up bearing witness to our society’s vicious inequalities? This is the first question that always strikes me whenever I read a work like Piri Thomas’ 1967 novel, Down These Mean Streets, about the author’s ghetto youth in Spanish Harlem. The answer is not far off. It can be found in the book and it lies within me.
Tuesday, 08 November 2011 20:51

Book Review - Good Offices by Evelio Rosero

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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The Catholic Church has had a bad press of late with a series of damaging child-abuse scandals and shameful cover-ups. Its opposition to contraception and abortion, its subjugation of women and its homophobia have also come under fire. EvelioRosero, prize-winning author of The Armies, offers a unique take on the Catholic Church’s institutional failings in this surreal portrait of one of its Colombian outposts.
Thursday, 27 October 2011 18:29

Campaign for Mexican Writers

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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Mexico’s El Día de Muertos (Day of the Dead) dates back to indigenous times. However, many of the celebrations associated with the festival, which takes place from 31 – 2 November, have evolved over time. In the 1890s, Jose Guadalupe Posada began the tradition of depicting satirical images of politicians and celebrities as skeletons. 
Monday, 03 October 2011 20:22

Horacio Castellanos Moya

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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Horacio Castellanos Moya was born in Honduras and raised in El Salvador. Throughout his career as a journalist and author, he has lived in Canada, Mexico, Guatemala, Germany and Japan, among others.
Sunday, 07 August 2011 18:43

Juan Pablo Villalobos

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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Juan Pablo Villalobos was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 1973. He studied marketing and Spanish literature. He has done a great deal of market research and published travel stories, and literary and film criticism. He has researched such diverse topics as the influence of the avant-garde on the work of César Aira and the flexibility of pipelines for electrical installations.
Sunday, 10 July 2011 18:26

Marcelo Figueras

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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MARCELO FIGUERAS, born in Buenos Aires in 1962, is a writer and screenwriter. He currently lives in Barcelona. His novel Kamchatka (Atlantic Books, 2010) was shortlisted for the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize.
Thursday, 07 July 2011 13:40

More, by Austin Clarke

Published in Literature Written by Sam
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How do we give a voice to those on the margins? We must, first, find their voice – for every human has a voice. We can wander into their world, into shops or up into high-rise flats, to listen out for conversation. Yet, what if we are talking of the furthest margins - those who are so isolated and harried as to barely have conversation?
Sunday, 15 May 2011 20:54

Carla Guelfenbein

Published in Literature Written by Lucy Popescu
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CARLA GUELFENBEIN was born in Santiago, Chile, and lived in England for 11 years, where she took degrees at the University of Essex and Central St Martin's. Returning to Chile, she worked as Art  and Fashion Director for the magazine Elle, until she decided to become a full-time novelist.
Sunday, 15 May 2011 20:19

Letters, Books, Typos and the Politics of Reproduction

Published in Literature Written by Luciana Lang
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It is generally accepted by those who investigate the terrain where the Brazilian literature emerged, that the first pieces of writing were concerned with addressing the impressions and reactions spawned by the newness of the physical and human landscapes found in Terra Brasilis.  
Friday, 13 May 2011 19:12

‘We Were Never Catechised’

Published in Literature Written by Luciana Lang
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“Só me interessa o que não é meu. Lei do Homem. Lei do Antropófago.” (Oswald de Andrade, 1928,  The Anthropophagic Manifesto)  
Sunday, 13 March 2011 21:23

Édouard Glissant and the Archipelago of the World

Published in Literature Written by Montague Kobbe
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Born in Sainte-Marie, Martinique on September 21, 1928, Édouard Glissant, was part of a pivotal generation in the development of French Caribbean thought in the XX century – a generation that included Franz Fanon, that overlapped with that of Aimé Césaire and that set the scene for the emergence of contemporary figures, such as Patrick Chamoiseau and Raphael Confiant.